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Now You Can Really Cut the Cord: Pirate TV Service

Now Has 500 Free TV Channels

The biggest barrier for cord cutters today remains the same as it was a month ago and a year ago: live TV. Eliminating your standard pay TV subscription means relying on on-demand services such as Netflix and Hulu, which are both fantastic solutions for streaming TV shows and movies. But with only a few exceptions such as HBO Now and WatchESPN that are only available to a limited number of people who subscribe to certain services, cord cutters cannot watch most live broadcasts. Now, however, there’s a pirate TV service that aims to change that — and as of Monday, it’s home to well over 500 channels of free streaming content. DON’T MISS: How Have You Survived This Long Without These 10 Brilliant Lifehacks? We first covered cCloud TV back in late May, when the service burst onto the scene and made a name for itself by allowing people to stream pay TV channels including HBO, ESPN, AMC, TBS, Showtime and more to their computers, smartphones and other devices. The pirate TV service has hit a few speed bumps since then, but now it’s back with a vengeance. The team of developers behind cCloud TV confirmed to BGR on Monday morning that the service is now home to more than 500 channels. While the exact number of streaming TV feeds fluctuates as old streams are taken offline and new ones are added, cCloud TV was home to more than 540 different channels at the time of this writing. From BGR

Find and watch free TV on the Internet

Generally, you have to pay for copyrighted material. The people who make TV shows expect to be paid for their work--just like you and me. Some Web sites offer free, bootlegged copies of TV shows. I don't use those sites and I don't recommend them. There's a lot I don't like about current American copyright law, but without it, you wouldn't have any new television shows, books, music, movies…or articles in PCWorld. [Email your tech questions to answer@pcworld.com.] But it's often in the copyright holders' interests to give away some shows for free. You may not get exactly what you want, but you'll certainly get more entertainment than you paid for. Try these sites: Youtube: Along with cat videos and regular folks spouting their personal philosophies, Youtube hosts a lot of professionally-made television. And parent company Google is pretty serious about keeping copy-protected material off the site unless the copyright holders have given their blessing. Just search for tv shows full episodes. Or search for a particular show, such as mad men full episodes. Monty Python has its own channel, and there's a lot of full Mystery Science Theater 3000 episodes here. From PC World

Sorry, NFL Games Streamed Free to TV Won’t

Become the Norm

NEXT YEAR, CBS will broadcast the Super Bowl for the first time since 2013. When it does, it will send the game not just to its traditional television viewers or its mobile app, but to Apple TV, Roku, Chromecast, and Xbox One, all for free, with no authentication required. For a very specific subset of sports-loving cord-cutters, Christmas has come early. The most common complaint about cutting the cord is that you can’t reliably watch sports, or other marquee live events like the Oscars. Workarounds like antennas or streaming television packages like Sling TV can be either clunky or unreliable. And previous adventures in bringing big events online for the masses have been hamstrung by a variety of limitations. ABC required cable subscription authentication to watch the Oscars, despite originating on a broadcast network—that is, as an event ostensibly viewable for free. NBC made last year’s Super Bowl available without authentication, but only on mobile apps and on the web. The network also streamed its Sunday night games on mobile apps, but required authentication for those. CBS has streamed AFC playoff games in the past with no authentication required, but only on mobile apps. It gets confusing. You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip. This year’s Super Bowl—along with a Thanksgiving NFL game, and another played in London—will suffer no such streaming restrictions. You won’t need to prove you have cable or buy an ungainly antenna to view it. You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip. “There’s not a one-size-fits-all approach with our streaming rights/offerings, and we always want to make sure we offer the best user experience for each event,” says CBS Interactive spokesperson Annie Rohrs. That’s a huge relief those who have abandoned live TV altogether in their quest for streaming liberation, and who weren’t planning to watch the Super Bowl at a friend’s house or bar. That’s likely a minuscule fraction, though, of the more than 100 million people who tune into the biggest game in sports every year. Which means, says streaming media analyst Dan Rayburn, that we shouldn’t read too much into it. From Wired

Comcast launches its own cable-free TV with Stream

The latest (and most interesting) entrant to the cord-cutting TV wars is here: Comcast. Tonight the company announced Stream, a service that delivers TV exclusively over the internet (Correction: it is "IP-based managed network" connection, check after the break for why that matters) to phones, tablets and computers -- but now TVs. The big catch? You'll need Comcast internet service to subscribe, and the Stream TV feeds only work while you're at home. It's only available in select areas to start, and will launch in Boston this summer. For $15 a month, subscribers get about a dozen channels, including all broadcast networks and HBO (but not ESPN or any other cable channels, according to the New York Times). It also has access to the usual TV Everywhere cable authenticated-streaming for when you're away from home, plus Comcast's Netflix-like Streampix service for movies. As for the at-home restriction on TV service, that's because, as a Comcast representative tells Engadget, this is "an IP-based cable service that offers live, on demand and cloud DVR delivered over our managed network in the home." In case you're somehow not familiar with what that means, it translates to this service not using the open internet everyone else uses to reach subscriber's homes, even though it runs through the same wiring and modem over the last mile. Comcast made the same distinction when it launched video on-demand streaming to the Xbox 360 a few years back, and Reed Hastings was not happy with the explanation. Given the current climate around net neutrality, we can't imagine this launch will go over without any controversy, and expect to hear more about that bit soon. From Engadget
Soccer on TV Snowboarding on TV
© ITT TV SOLUTIONS 2010 CONTACT US     |     TERMS OF USE     |     PRIVACY
ITT TV Solutions
anim et mollit occaecat eiusmod

Now You Can Really Cut the Cord:

Pirate TV Service Now Has 500

Free TV Channels

The biggest barrier for cord cutters today remains the same as it was a month ago and a year ago: live TV. Eliminating your standard pay TV subscription means relying on on-demand services such as Netflix and Hulu, which are both fantastic solutions for streaming TV shows and movies. But with only a few exceptions such as HBO Now and WatchESPN that are only available to a limited number of people who subscribe to certain services, cord cutters cannot watch most live broadcasts. Now, however, there’s a pirate TV service that aims to change that — and as of Monday, it’s home to well over 500 channels of free streaming content. DON’T MISS: How Have You Survived This Long Without These 10 Brilliant Lifehacks? We first covered cCloud TV back in late May, when the service burst onto the scene and made a name for itself by allowing people to stream pay TV channels including HBO, ESPN, AMC, TBS, Showtime and more to their computers, smartphones and other devices. The pirate TV service has hit a few speed bumps since then, but now it’s back with a vengeance. The team of developers behind cCloud TV confirmed to BGR on Monday morning that the service is now home to more than 500 channels. While the exact number of streaming TV feeds fluctuates as old streams are taken offline and new ones are added, cCloud TV was home to more than 540 different channels at the time of this writing. From BGR

Find and watch free TV on the

Internet

Generally, you have to pay for copyrighted material. The people who make TV shows expect to be paid for their work--just like you and me. Some Web sites offer free, bootlegged copies of TV shows. I don't use those sites and I don't recommend them. There's a lot I don't like about current American copyright law, but without it, you wouldn't have any new television shows, books, music, movies…or articles in PCWorld. [Email your tech questions to answer@pcworld.com.] But it's often in the copyright holders' interests to give away some shows for free. You may not get exactly what you want, but you'll certainly get more entertainment than you paid for. Try these sites: Youtube: Along with cat videos and regular folks spouting their personal philosophies, Youtube hosts a lot of professionally-made television. And parent company Google is pretty serious about keeping copy-protected material off the site unless the copyright holders have given their blessing. Just search for tv shows full episodes. Or search for a particular show, such as mad men full episodes. Monty Python has its own channel, and there's a lot of full Mystery Science Theater 3000 episodes here. From PC World

Sorry, NFL Games Streamed Free

to TV Won’t Become the Norm

NEXT YEAR, CBS will broadcast the Super Bowl for the first time since 2013. When it does, it will send the game not just to its traditional television viewers or its mobile app, but to Apple TV, Roku, Chromecast, and Xbox One, all for free, with no authentication required. For a very specific subset of sports-loving cord-cutters, Christmas has come early. The most common complaint about cutting the cord is that you can’t reliably watch sports, or other marquee live events like the Oscars. Workarounds like antennas or streaming television packages like Sling TV can be either clunky or unreliable. And previous adventures in bringing big events online for the masses have been hamstrung by a variety of limitations. ABC required cable subscription authentication to watch the Oscars, despite originating on a broadcast network—that is, as an event ostensibly viewable for free. NBC made last year’s Super Bowl available without authentication, but only on mobile apps and on the web. The network also streamed its Sunday night games on mobile apps, but required authentication for those. CBS has streamed AFC playoff games in the past with no authentication required, but only on mobile apps. It gets confusing. You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip. This year’s Super Bowl—along with a Thanksgiving NFL game, and another played in London—will suffer no such streaming restrictions. You won’t need to prove you have cable or buy an ungainly antenna to view it. You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip. “There’s not a one-size-fits-all approach with our streaming rights/offerings, and we always want to make sure we offer the best user experience for each event,” says CBS Interactive spokesperson Annie Rohrs. That’s a huge relief those who have abandoned live TV altogether in their quest for streaming liberation, and who weren’t planning to watch the Super Bowl at a friend’s house or bar. That’s likely a minuscule fraction, though, of the more than 100 million people who tune into the biggest game in sports every year. Which means, says streaming media analyst Dan Rayburn, that we shouldn’t read too much into it. From Wired

Comcast launches its own cable-

free TV with Stream

The latest (and most interesting) entrant to the cord- cutting TV wars is here: Comcast. Tonight the company announced Stream, a service that delivers TV exclusively over the internet (Correction: it is "IP- based managed network" connection, check after the break for why that matters) to phones, tablets and computers -- but now TVs. The big catch? You'll need Comcast internet service to subscribe, and the Stream TV feeds only work while you're at home. It's only available in select areas to start, and will launch in Boston this summer. For $15 a month, subscribers get about a dozen channels, including all broadcast networks and HBO (but not ESPN or any other cable channels, according to the New York Times). It also has access to the usual TV Everywhere cable authenticated-streaming for when you're away from home, plus Comcast's Netflix-like Streampix service for movies. As for the at-home restriction on TV service, that's because, as a Comcast representative tells Engadget, this is "an IP-based cable service that offers live, on demand and cloud DVR delivered over our managed network in the home." In case you're somehow not familiar with what that means, it translates to this service not using the open internet everyone else uses to reach subscriber's homes, even though it runs through the same wiring and modem over the last mile. Comcast made the same distinction when it launched video on-demand streaming to the Xbox 360 a few years back, and Reed Hastings was not happy with the explanation. Given the current climate around net neutrality, we can't imagine this launch will go over without any controversy, and expect to hear more about that bit soon. From Engadget
Soccer on TV